5 Accomplishments to Make Your Psychologist Resume Stand Out

If you google “psychologist resume template”, you’ll find a lot of resume models filled with roles and responsibilities such as:

  • Provided individual and group counseling to students, K-9th grade.
  • Conducted psychological testing using assessment tools such as the MMPI-II.
  • Provided individual therapy to shelter residents with severe psychopathology and acute substance abuse.
  • Participated in workplace violence evaluations.
  • Evaluated and consulted children in classrooms at the request of educators.
  • Linked consumers to necessary health services, social services, self-help groups, wellness centers.

That seems about right, no? But there’s a problem. A huge problem, actually. Think of the psychologists that you know. How many of them have done similar things? Probably most of them. Because that’s pretty much what being a psychologist is all about. There are differences here and there, but roles and responsibilities will often overlap. So if your resume is very close to a typical “psychologist resume template”, how is that helping you get interviews? After all, the best resumes are distinctive. They make you stand out, not blend in! So here’s a little something to help you make your resume stand out. It’s based on the 3 Laws of Resume Writing. And it’s not material that I made up. I found it by carefully studying good psychologist resumes.

5 Psychologist Accomplishments to Make your Resume Distinctive

  1. Responsible for the overall management and supervision of the Dual Diagnosis Unit at [hospital].
  2. Wrote several articles on psychological well-being for major news outlets, including the Huffington Post.
  3. Changed the clinic from a half-day program for adults with severe mental illness, to an outpatient clinic. The offices have been restructured to facilitate group therapy and individual therapy.
  4. Established a private practice providing individual, couple, family and group counseling, throughout [city], with a caseload above 50.
  5. Initiated proper referrals within the hospital, and utilized outside referral sources throughout the community.

The benefit is the key component of each accomplishment: improved processes, more money, demonstrated leadership and reliability, … Accomplishments like these are the most critical pieces of your resume. Now read that last sentence again, because that’s the best resume advice you’ll get this month.

If you’re a fantastic employee but your resume is silent on many of your accomplishments, you’ll end up behind a good employee whose accomplishments are all clearly laid out. And for that matter, an average employee with weak accomplishments better know how to network, since the resume alone won’t pull its weight. (Actually, networking skills are critical to everyone’s job hunt. But let’s stick with the topic, if you don’t mind.) Accomplishments are where it’s at.

When you solve a problem, reduce costs, make something better/simpler/faster, when you show initiative, it has to be on your resume, without being drowned out by too many roles and responsibilities (i.e. the “we’ve-all-done-it” resume template material). In my view, half of the energy and time spent on your resume should be focused on your accomplishments. To write good accomplishments, you need to think of what your potential employer is thinking about (problems solved, better results, and so on) and emphasize that. If you go through 20 resumes of your peers, you’ll certainly find great accomplishments that you could adapt on your resume. I truly believe that is time well spent.

Many More Accomplishments, Just for You

However, I’ve already done that research… The 5 ideas above are just a glimpse of the full list of accomplishments I’ve assembled. If you’d like that well-rounded, unique list of real-world psychologist accomplishments, for just a few dollars, check out our e-book, Psychologist Resume Hacking, on Amazon. You can read it even if you don’t have a Kindle device.

I.T. Technician Resume Hacking

If you’re an IT technician looking to improve your resume, this book is just for you! And we mean just for you. All the examples in here are tailored for computer technicians. We actually went through many of your peers’ resumes, to identify what made the best stand out. This is what you’ll find in this guide: the most relevant, high impact material from IT technician resumes. So our examples are all about installing software, troubleshooting, networks and customer service. It’s not a comprehensive resume guide by any means; there’s already tons of generic resume advice out there. Our e-books are quite short (around 3000 words), but straight to the point, because they have a single purpose: helping you make your resume distinctive. We do that by providing you stuff that is both highly valuable and uncommon in your field.

Our goal is to help you get more interviews, through a “do-it-yourself-in-one-afternoon” resume hacking guide.

GET IT NOW, on Amazon.com!

And if you don’t have Kindle, it’s not too complicated.

How to Write your First Resume (Graduate Resume)?

Are you just out of school and trying to figure out where to start, in writing your post-graduation resume? Here are some tips to understand the strategy you can apply to make your resume more compelling.

The big idea: focus on what your reader is looking for!

As a recent graduate, you won’t have tons of work experience, but that doesn’t mean you should add filler — it will only weigh down your resume. You’re not looking for big words, you need substance. So don’t worry about having a short resume. It’s expected, in your case. Here’s how it will differ from a typical resume (for instance, if you’re using a template.)

And be mindful of your readers’ limited time to look at your resume. They’ll most likely start by quickly scanning your resume (for 10-15 seconds, as has been repeatedly demonstrated). The key information must be very easy to spot! In the future, your resume will be designed to highlight many accomplishments. But for now, you don’t you probably don’t have a lot of accomplishments and results to build on, so focus on quick impact. Think of your resume as a movie trailer. Packed with good stuff. Leaves you craving for more!

So hold back from putting too much. Aim for one page.

How do you structure your resume?

The various sections are as follows:

  • Contact Information
  • Objective Statement
  • Education
  • Experience
  • Technical/Computer Skills
  • (Other)

After opening with your name and contact info, follow with an objective statement. That will also be different when you have more experience, later on. (It’s gonna be replaced by a summary). But for now, a crisp objective statement will give a quick glimpse to the reader.

Your objective statement is made of 3 parts: 1. Quality, 2. Training/education, 3. Job you want to do.

Examples of objective statements for recent grads

  • Dynamic business analyst looking for an entry position in a Fortune 500 company.
  • Freshly graduated computer engineer who wants to do web development for one of those crazy startups.

As the second bullet illustrates, this short sentence might be the only spot on your resume where you can have a natural tone without upsetting convention. Of course, adapt your style to the company that will be reading this! A startup is a place where people work in flip flops and t-shirts. They won’t roll their eyes if they read a casual sentence or two. But don’t try this with a pharmaceutical company or a bank. If you get the tone right, you’ll create a good first impression.

Some resume writers now go for a personal branding statement or a mission statement. It’s fairly similar in approach, but it often has a “first person” perspective to it (“Through my energy and natural confidence, I create…”, or “I inspire teams and companies to overcome…”). I think it can work well, but you just have to be careful not to sound arrogant or out of touch, by overstating how efficient, inspiring and innovative you are.    

After the objective statement comes your Education section. Obviously, the school, diplomas, etc. A good GPA can be shown in there, and you can also put relevant coursework. Scholarships, awards or internships (any way to show academic success) are very good – they show you went above the basic requirements. It demonstrates you have initiative and professionalism, which adds a lot to your resume.

If you feel like your resume lacks some punch, you can always get a reference letter from a professor, and include a quote (2-3 sentences) from that reference letter on your cover letter. It would be a bold move to put it directly on your resume (under a subtitle such as “Endorsement”), but it might work with less traditional employers.

Then comes the Experience section. Later on in your career (maybe 3-4 years from now), you’ll have to move it up before the Education section. It will be more substantial then. However, the 3 Laws of resume writing already apply: if you can put accomplishments in there right now, instead of just roles and responsibilities, that will help you score more points. Additionally, don’t add too much which doesn’t pertain to the job you’re applying for. In other words, your lifeguard position or similar “summer jobs” need to be presented concisely.  

Finally, a Technical Skills section is a great way to complete your resume with the most relevant skills for the job you’re looking for. If you don’t have much, computer skills are often expected, even if you feel it goes without saying (Windows, MS Word, Powerpoint…). So include them; don’t give recruiters (or automated systems) a silly reason to throw out your resume! In some cases, another section might be valuable, especially for volunteering, special projects (an event you’ve organized, a video game you’ve worked on) or team sports (shows a capacity for teamwork or even leadership, if you were captain).

Marketing Resume Hacking

If you’re a marketing professional looking to improve your resume, this book is just for you! And we mean just for you. All the examples in here are tailored for marketers, event planners, campaign managers, digital media or advertising pros; we actually went through many of your peers’ resumes, to identify what made the best stand out. This is what you’ll find in this guide: the most relevant material from marketing resumes. So our examples are all about social media, branding, business development and market penetration.

It’s not a comprehensive resume guide by any means; there’s already tons of generic resume advice out there. Our e-books are quite short (around 3000 words), but straight to the point, because they have a single purpose: helping you make your resume distinctive. We do that by providing you stuff that is both highly valuable and uncommon in your field.

Our goal is to help you get more interviews, through a “do-it-yourself-in-one-afternoon” resume hacking guide.

GET IT NOW, on Amazon.com!

And if you don’t have Kindle, it’s not too complicated.

5 Accomplishments to Make Your Database Administrator Resume Stand Out

If you google “database administrator resume template”, you’ll find a lot of resume models filled with roles and responsibilities such as:

  • Troubleshooting Forms server, Reports server, Apache server, Jserv, Jinitiator and Workflow.
  • Installation, configuration and deployment of Oracle E-Business Suite versions 11i and R12.
  • Management of schemas, objects and partitioning the tables and indexes.
  • Gathering database statistics using DBMS_UTILITY, DBMS_STATS, and FND_STATS packages.
  • Database performance monitoring and tuning.

That seems about right, no?

But there’s a problem. A huge problem, actually. Think of the database administrators that you know. How many of them have done similar things? Probably most of them. Because that’s pretty much what being a DBA is all about. There are differences here and there, but roles and responsibilities will often overlap. So if your resume is very close to a typical “DBA resume template”, how is that helping you get interviews? After all, the best resumes are distinctive. They make you stand out, not blend in!

So here’s a little something to help you make your resume stand out. It’s based on the 3 Laws of Resume Writing. And it’s not material that I made up. I found it by carefully studying good DBA resumes.

5 DBA Accomplishments to Make your Resume Distinctive

  1. Upgraded over 20 SQL servers to the latest service pack level in a 3-month period. (I’m not sure how big of a deal it is to upgrade 20 SQL servers, but the fact that it is measured — in this case, within 3 months — adds more weight to this employee’s capabilities.)
  2. Led a team of 16 core and application DBAs, responsible for the day-to-day operations of the single global instance. (Here, we see both leadership and management, since managing staff means setting priorities, getting people to work as a team, coaching, having tough discussions… The list goes on. And 16 isn’t a small team!)
  3. Improved vital processing jobs by reducing process duration by 60%. (This is a concrete, positive result, and time saved is always appreciated, from the employer’s perspective.)
  4. Enrolled users, maintained system security, and controlled and monitored user access to the database, operating 24/7, with 40-50 concurrent users at any given time. (The measurable aspects of this item lends it more credibility. People like numbers, and seeing “24/7” and “40-50 users” is compelling to human brains. The numbers don’t have to be huge.)
  5. Eliminated months of production server issues by systematically troubleshooting and resolving the problem with no further downtime. (Here, we see dedication, and an attitude to get something done, since this problem seems to have been occuring for a while.)

The benefit is the key component of each accomplishment: improved operations, more money, demonstrated leadership and reliability, … Accomplishments like these are the most critical pieces of your resume. Now read that last sentence again, because that’s the best resume advice you’ll get this month.

If you’re a fantastic employee but your resume is silent on many of your accomplishments, you’ll end up behind a good employee whose accomplishments are all clearly laid out.

And for that matter, an average employee with weak accomplishments better know how to network, since the resume alone won’t pull its weight. (Actually, networking skills are critical to everyone’s job hunt. But I’m more of a resume guy, so let’s stick with the topic, if you don’t mind.)

Accomplishments are where it’s at. When you solve a problem, reduce costs, make something better/simpler/faster, when you show initiative, it has to be on your resume, without being drowned out by too much roles and responsibilities (i.e. the “we’ve-all-done-it” resume template material). In my view, half of the energy and time spent on your resume should be focused on your accomplishments. To write good accomplishments, you need to think of what your potential employer is thinking about (problems solved, better results, and so on) and emphasize that. If you go through 20 resumes of your peers, you’ll certainly find great accomplishments that you could adapt on your resume. I truly believe that is time well spent.

Many More Accomplishments, Just for You

I’ve already done that research… The 5 ideas above are just a glimpse of the full list of accomplishments I’ve assembled. If you’d like that well-rounded, unique list of real-world DBA accomplishments, for just a few dollars, check out our e-book, Database Administrator Resume Hacking, on Amazon. You can read it even if you don’t have a Kindle device.

Get your Programmer Resume Noticed, with a Compelling Summary

Many job descriptions for programmers weren’t written by people who know how to code. But your resume needs to meet their basic criteria, while also going in sufficient depth to demonstrate you’ve got the chops. The resume summary is a very rich section designed to quickly demonstrate you’ve got what it takes! Let’s look at two examples of very compelling resume summaries for programmers. Before we do that, I want to confess that I use the term “programmer” very inclusively, as I’m just a resume writer and I have a limited understanding of the coder’s totem pole, which seems somewhat debated (i.e. the real meaning of programmer, software developer, software engineer, and so on). Wherever you picture yourself, I think that you stand to greatly benefit from these examples.

1. Highlights of resume for Grenada Inc.

  • 8 years of experience in software development at large corporations, with master’s degree in Computer Science from Purdue University.
  • Experienced communicator who can explain simply the most complex technical concepts.
  • Improved database load times 10x by implementing incremental update process.
  • Created two-player game over bluetooth for the iPhone, programmed in Objective C.

2. Summary for Consulting ABC Inc.

  • Business and technology executive with expertise in computer systems and infrastructure.
  • Regularly introduces leading-edge application concepts and methods to programming projects.
  • Created a system to replace a MySQL backed system, which was able to perform a better job using half the hardware, and with a fraction of the previous level of complexity and maintenance.
  • Part of the core team that secured two rounds of funding for [company].
  • Responsible for managing (and recruiting) four other software developers.

The goal of the summary is to: 1. show you qualify and 2. build a strong first impression. And you do that very, very quickly, in a few bullets. Unless you’re too early in your career, you should mention how many years of experience you have. Also touch on the sectors or specialties you’ve worked in. You could also try to highlight whether you’re stronger with certain languages (or language types) or specific methodologies.

Make sure your resume summary is tailored!

Always remember the job ad when preparing your summary. Maybe you’ll see certain keywords in there that need to be emphasized. There’s no such thing as a good one-size-fits-all resume. It has to be customized. As I often repeat, accomplishments are the strongest elements of your resume, because they make you stand out from the crowd of programmers. On your resume, you want as many accomplishments as possible. But in your summary, you have to choose a few that seem most relevant for the specific job you’re applying on. Which means that your summary repeats your key accomplishments. It’s a smart thing to be redundant with the most valuable info on your resume! A potential employer won’t mind that you insist on having led a team and hired engineers, or made a database load 10 times faster! If you write a strong summary using these tips, potential employers are much more likely to give your resume a good read. And that’s a necessary step to getting more interviews!

More tips for programmers

If you’re looking for more advice specifically for software developers, check out 5 accomplishments for programmers. But if you feel like 5 isn’t enough, get the Programmer Resume Hacking e-book!

Business Analyst Resume Hacking

If you’re a business analyst looking to improve your resume, this book is just for you! And we mean just for you. All the examples in here are tailored for business analysts (and systems analysts, integration analysts, data analysts); we actually went through many of your peers’ resumes, to identify what made the best stand out. This is what you’ll find in this guide: the most relevant material from business analyst resumes. So our examples are all about system enhancements, data models, process management, business rules, functional statements

It’s not a comprehensive resume guide by any means; there’s already tons of generic resume advice out there. Our e-books are quite short (around 3000 words), but straight to the point, because they have a single purpose: helping you make your resume distinctive. We do that by providing you stuff that is both highly valuable and uncommon in your field.

Our goal is to help you get more interviews, through a “do-it-yourself-in-one-afternoon” resume hacking guide.

GET BUSINESS ANALYST RESUME HACKING NOW, on Amazon.com, for only $4.99!

And if you don’t have Kindle, you’ll still be able to read it.

5 Accomplishments to Make Your Programmer Resume Stand Out

If you google “Programmer resume template”, you’ll find a lot of resume models filled with roles and responsibilities such as:

  • Server maintenance and scripting while coordinating with the server team.
  • Maintenance and ongoing development of procedures and setup of dev/stage/production environments.
  • Maintained backup, email and anti-spam solution for clients.
  • Web site system design, configuration, admin/programming, database design, scripting.
  • Advised various internal groups on technical directions.

That seems about right, no?

But there’s a problem. A huge problem, actually. Think of the programmers or software engineers that you know. How many of them have done similar things? Probably most of them. Because that’s pretty much what being a programmer is all about. There are differences here and there, but roles and responsibilities will often overlap. So if your resume is very close to a typical “programmer resume template”, how is that helping you get interviews? After all, the best resumes are distinctive. They make you stand out, not blend in!

So here’s a little something to help you make your resume stand out. It’s based on the 3 Laws of Resume Writing. And it’s not material that I made up. I found it by carefully studying good programmer resumes.

5 Programmer Accomplishments to Make your Resume Distinctive

  1. Responsible for managing code deployment to one of the most popular mobile communications sites in North America. (Demonstrates reliability for being responsible for something big, that impacts so many users.)
  2. Started a team effort to switch to a more agile process by building tools to make unit testing easier and helping to create a sized backlog. (Very good way of demonstrating leadership and team work, combined to a desire to improve the way things are done.)
  3. Created a system to replace a MySQL backed system, which was able to perform a better job using half the hardware of the old system at a fraction of the complexity and maintenance of the old system. (Doing things more simply and efficiently usually translates to money saved, which is always seen positively by a potential employer.)
  4. Improved database load times 10x by implementing incremental update process. (This very significant improvement demonstrates a desire for efficiency, and the skillset to make it happen.)
  5. Created two-player game over bluetooth for the iPhone. (Here, we can guess that the programmer is passionate, because that game was probably coded at home. Plus, it means carrying a project from A to Z.)

The benefit is the key component of each accomplishment: improved operations, more money, demonstrated leadership and reliability, … Accomplishments like these are the most critical pieces of your resume. Now read that last sentence again, because that’s the best resume advice you’ll get this month.

If you’re a fantastic employee but your resume is silent on many of your accomplishments, you’ll end up behind a good employee whose accomplishments are all clearly laid out.

And for that matter, an average employee with weak accomplishments better know how to network, since the resume alone won’t pull its weight. (Actually, networking skills are critical to everyone’s job hunt. But I’m more of a resume guy, so let’s stick with the topic, if you don’t mind.)

Accomplishments are where it’s at. When you solve a problem, reduce costs, make something better/simpler/faster, when you show initiative, it has to be on your resume, without being drowned out by too much roles and responsibilities (i.e. the “we’ve-all-done-it” resume template material). In my view, half of the energy and time spent on your resume should be focused on your accomplishments. To write good accomplishments, you need to think of what your potential employer is thinking about (problems solved, better results, and so on) and emphasize that. If you go through 20 resumes of your peers, you’ll certainly find great accomplishments that you could adapt on your resume. I truly believe that is time well spent.

Many More Accomplishments, Just for You

However, I’ve already done that research… The 5 ideas above are just a glimpse of the full list of accomplishments I’ve assembled. If you’d like that well-rounded, unique list of real-world programmer accomplishments, for just a few dollars, check out our e-book, Programmer Resume Hacking, on Amazon. You can read it even if you don’t have a Kindle device.

Quickly Get your Dentist Resume Noticed, with a Compelling Summary

In order to quickly show your skills and value as a dentist, you should open with a resume summary. Here are two examples of very compelling resume summaries for dentists. The first is for a former clinic owner who wants to go back to just being a dentist. The second is a younger dentist with less experience.

1. Highlights of resume for ABC Clinic Inc.

  • General dentist with 20 years of experience, including experience with restorative dentistry, fixed and removable prosthodontics, endodontics, extractions, cleaning and sealant.
  • Owned my own general dental practice for over a decade, which means that I understand the concept of production, bottom line and the need to efficiently treat patients with a smile on my face and exceptional customer service.
  • Was able to gross $3,000 per day with efficient quality practice.
  • Always keeping an eye out for dental technology and integrating new tools to my practice.

2. Summary for Doctor Sweettooth

  • As an energetic, dedicated and knowledgeable dental practitioner with 5 years of experience, I have well-rounded technical expertise and a natural ability to care for young children.
  • Supervised 2 receptionists, 4 dental assistants, 2 dental laboratory technicians, an office manager and an associate dentist.
  • Demonstrated dedication by providing discounted or pro bono dental work for victims of domestic abuse.

The goal of the summary is to: 1. show you qualify and 2. build a strong first impression. And you do that very, very quickly, in a few bullets. Unless you’re too early in your career, you should mention how many years of experience you have. You could also try to highlight whether you’re stronger with a certain public, or uncommon technologies or procedures, or feel generally well-rounded.

Make sure your resume summary is tailored!

Always remember the job ad when preparing your summary. Maybe you’ll see certain keywords in there that need to be emphasized. There’s no such thing as a good one-size-fits-all resume. It has to be customized. As I often repeat, accomplishments are the strongest elements of your resume, because they make you stand out from the crowd of dentists. On your resume, you want as many accomplishments as possible. But in your summary, you have to choose a few that seem most relevant for the specific job you’re applying for. Which means that your summary repeats your key accomplishments. It’s a smart thing to be redundant with the most valuable info on your resume! A potential employer won’t mind that you insist on grossing $3,000 per day or that you provided pro bono dental work for marginalized communities!

If you write a strong summary using these tips, potential employers are much more likely to give your resume a good read. And that’s a necessary step to getting more interviews!

More tips for dentists

If you’re looking for more advice specifically for dentists, check out 5 accomplishments for dentists. But if you feel like 5 isn’t enough, get the Dentist Resume Hacking e-book! (The examples above are taken from this book.)

5 Accomplishments to Make Your Dentist Resume Stand Out

If you google “dentist resume template”, you’ll find a lot of resume models filled with roles and responsibilities such as:

  • Perform any treatment needed including restorative, crown and bridge, endodontics and extractions.
  • Design and review treatment plans with patients.
  • Interact effectively with colleagues, managers and patients on all levels.
  • Provided direct dental care to patients, following approved protocols for standard of care.
  • Placed and restored both single and multiple tooth implant-based restorations.
  • Oral surgery including extraction of third molars which were soft and partial bony impactions.

That seems about right, no? But there’s a problem. A huge problem, actually. Think of the dentists that you know. How many of them have done similar things? Probably most of them. Because that’s pretty much what being a dentist is all about. There are differences here and there, but roles and responsibilities will often overlap. So if your resume is very close to a typical “dentist resume template”, how is that helping you get interviews? After all, the best resumes are distinctive. They make you stand out, not blend in! So here’s a little something to help you make your resume stand out. It’s based on the 3 Laws of Resume Writing. And it’s not material that I made up. I found it by carefully studying good dentist resumes.

5 Dentist Accomplishments to Make your Resume Distinctive

  1. Was able to gross $3,000 per day with efficient quality practice. (Using numbers to demonstrate results is a very concrete way to show what you can do. Especially for revenue! And the numbers don’t have to be staggering.)
  2. Patients were very satisfied with my arrival and the clinic got several patient referrals in a short period of time. (Any clinic owner will be glad to see patient referrals, since they contribute to a healthy business for years to come.)
  3. Modernized clinic by encouraging the introduction of new dental materials, equipment and office administration technology. (This accomplishment says that you’re proactive as an employee, and also that you like a job well done, since you want to work with the best tools available.)
  4. Supervised 2 receptionists, 4 dental assistants, 2 dental laboratory technicians, an office manager and an associate dentist. (Leadership experience is always sought after. It means you can help with a lot of tasks: coaching, salary discussions, schedule management…)
  5. Demonstrated dedication by providing discounted or pro bono dental work for victims of domestic abuse. (It’s very easy to believe in this dentist’s dedication, since working pro bono means you genuinely care for people and probably take pride in the value of your work.)

The benefit is the key component of each accomplishment: improved operations, more money, demonstrated leadership and reliability, … Accomplishments like these are the most critical pieces of your resume. Now read that last sentence again, because that’s the best resume advice you’ll get this month. If you’re a fantastic employee but your resume is silent on many of your accomplishments, you’ll end up behind a good employee whose accomplishments are all clearly laid out. And for that matter, an average employee with weak accomplishments better know how to network, since the resume alone won’t pull its weight. (Actually, networking skills are critical to everyone’s job hunt. But let’s stick with the topic, if you don’t mind.) Accomplishments are where it’s at.

When you solve a problem, reduce costs, make something better/simpler/faster, when you show initiative, it has to be on your resume, without being drowned out by too many roles and responsibilities (i.e. the “we’ve-all-done-it” resume template material). In my view, half of the energy and time spent on your resume should be focused on your accomplishments. To write good accomplishments, you need to think of what your potential employer is thinking about (problems solved, better results, and so on) and emphasize that. If you go through 20 resumes of your peers, you’ll certainly find great accomplishments that you could adapt on your resume. I truly believe that is time well spent.

Many More Accomplishments, Just for You

However, I’ve already done that research… The 5 ideas above are just a glimpse of the full list of accomplishments I’ve assembled. If you’d like that well-rounded, unique list of real-world dentist accomplishments, for just a few dollars, check out our e-book, Dentist Resume Hacking, on Amazon. You can read it even if you don’t have a Kindle device.